Morning Flight, 23-24 August 2016

Two previous nights of conditions conducive for migration, but perhaps not quite perfect for getting birds on the Cape, brought new arrivals and building numbers.  Cape May, Magnolia, and Black-throated Blue Warblers were new on Tuesday, and Red-breasted Nuthatches have truly announced their intentions of irruptive migration this autumn with no less than 9 individuals. 

One nuthatch in the third hour on Tuesday was extra inquisitive and flew around us atop the Higbee Dike.  Red-breasted Nuthatches are often easy to entice with pishing and imitations of their cute, squeaky voice--  "Meep meep, nert nert nurt, griff griff, etc!"  Well this particular nuthatch really liked the imitations approached with 2 feet of my shoulder 4 times!  After two minutes of bouncing around us it returned to the south treeline, when suddenly an early Merlin burst into pursuit.  The little "nert nert" got away, but I will be much more careful when speaking Nuthatch-ese next time!

23 August 2016

Counting period: 06:05 - 06:21 & 06:20 - 09:20 
Count type: all species
Weather (first period): wind NE3, temperature 19 ℃, 0 % cc, max viz, I visitor
Observers (first period): Glen Davis

NSNSNS
Great Egret  2  -  Tree Swallow  2  -  American Redstart  132  1  
Snowy Egret  7  1  Purple Martin  79  -  Cape May Warbler  1  -  
warbler sp.  35  -  Barn Swallow  15  13  Northern Parula  1  -  
Semipalmated Plover  -  1  Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  34  1  Magnolia Warbler  1  -  
Killdeer  -  1  Red-breasted Nuthatch  9  -  Blackburnian Warbler  1  -  
Short-billed Dowitcher  -  1  Northern Mockingbird  4  1  Yellow Warbler  31  -  
Greater Yellowlegs  -  5  European Starling  7  13  Black-throated Blue Warbler  1  -  
Semipalmated Sandpiper  -  2  American Robin  5  1  Prairie Warbler  5  -  
Black Tern  -  1  House Finch  14  -  Bobolink  42  25  
Mourning Dove  42  6  American Goldfinch  11  2  Baltimore Oriole  47  -  
Chimney Swift  1  -  Ovenbird  1  -  Orchard Oriole  2  -  
Merlin *  -  1  Worm-eating Warbler  2  -  Red-winged Blackbird  317  397  
Eastern Kingbird  206  3  Louisiana/Northern Waterthrush  1  -  Brown-headed Cowbird  -  11  
Great Crested Flycatcher  1  -  Northern Waterthrush  8  1  Common Grackle  9  2  
Red-eyed Vireo  2  -  Blue-winged Warbler  1  -  Monarch  2  2  
Cedar Waxwing  192  12  Black-and-white Warbler  15  -    

Totals: 1792 individuals, 47 species, 3:16 hours

Present: House Wren 1




Wednesday, 24 August 2016

Counting period: 06:06 - 08:21 
Count type: all species
Weather (first period): wind SE0, temperature 19 ℃, 0% cc, max viz
Observers (first period): Glen Davis

NSNSNS
Tricolored Heron *  1  -  Barn Swallow  1  136  Black-and-white Warbler  2  -  
Snowy Egret  4  -  Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  2  -  American Redstart  16  1  
warbler sp.  6  -  Red-breasted Nuthatch  1  -  Yellow Warbler  4  -  
Solitary Sandpiper  -  1  European Starling  -  2  Prairie Warbler  1  -  
Turnstone  -  2  American Robin  -  1  Bobolink  -  1  
Mourning Dove  16  17  House Sparrow  -  3  Baltimore Oriole  3  3  
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  2  -  American Goldfinch  1  1  Orchard Oriole  1  -  
Eastern Kingbird  8  48  Ovenbird  3  -  Red-winged Blackbird  31  1  
Cedar Waxwing  5  4  Northern Waterthrush  6  2  Common Grackle  -  4  
Purple Martin  3  -  Louisiana/Northern Waterthrush  2  -  Monarch  -  1  

Totals: 347 individuals, 30 species, 2:15 hours

Present: Eastern Kingbird 30

Morning Flight, 22 August 2016


The count was made today in a cool, gusty atmosphere that was so delightful to feel, contrasting with August's typical weather catalog.  Powerful ~20 mph winds were brought to bear across the region last night, perhaps a little too strong to produce full Neotropical splendor, that is-- large diversity and numbers of long-distance migrants.  Or was it perhaps the lingering precipitation in a large zone in the northeast that could have somewhat squelched large lift-off-headed-our-way?

Barn Swallow may arguably be the longest distance passerine migrant in the world ("passerine" = Phylum Passeriformes = songbirds).  At least their summer and winter ranges stretch farthest north and south, and they totally command aerial respect.  They are amazingly efficient physically and physiologically.  Today was the only day so far with very strong winds and also the only day where all swallow movement was north at Morning Flight.  Hmm...  perhaps the "Barnies" were drifting or trying to avoid drifting out over the ocean and following the geographic contours of the Cape May Peninsula?  Eastern Kingbird, Cedar Waxwing, and Bobolink shared the flight-lines with the swallows today.  Could they have been up to something similar?

EDIT**--  I forgot-- Massive Kudos!! to Richard Crossley and Tom Johnson for their skill with our lovely Lark Sparrow this AM.  -GD

Conditions are looking terrific for another try tonight!  Get ready for LIFT-OFF!!!


SpeciesMonday, 22 AUGSeason totalSeason maximum
NorthSouthNorthSouthNorth onlyDate(s)
American Goldfinch309738/16/2016
8/22/2016
American Redstart140794458/20/2016
American Robin3010348/19/2016
Baltimore Oriole106058/19/2016
Bank Swallow101818/22/2016
Barn Swallow461127446678/19/2016
Black-and-white Warbler1118478/19/2016
Bobolink11033174118/22/2016
Bonaparte's Gull101018/22/2016
Cedar Waxwing2110215432118/22/2016
Eastern Kingbird48776554534878/22/2016
European Starling1003685198/20/2016
Great Egret022024148/20/2016
Killdeer02070
Lark Sparrow101018/22/2016
Least Sandpiper0711118/16/2016
Louisiana/Northern Waterthrush309238/19/2016
8/20/2016
8/22/2016
Mourning Dove20012773338/20/2016
Northern Parula111118/22/2016
Northern Waterthrush41316128/20/2016
Orchard Oriole101018/22/2016
Prairie Warbler104028/19/2016
Purple Martin1001652108/22/2016
Red-winged Blackbird342351715343348/19/2016
Ruby-throated Hummingbird013128/19/2016
Semipalmated Plover313738/22/2016
Tree Swallow204428/19/2016
8/22/2016
warbler sp.50245118/20/2016
Western/Semipalmated Sandpiper06060

Morning Flight, 18-21 August 2016

Today was day 6 of the season and significantly the slowest morning so far.  The present season totals as well as today's small count are posted below.  We are looking forward to the strong cold front that is on it's way.  The next few days should be very good birding!


2016
21 Aug
Mourning Dove
248
9
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
1

Chimney Swift
28

Belted Kingfisher
3

Bank Swallow
10

Tree Swallow
8

Barn Swallow
653
23
Cedar Waxwing
107

Northern Mockingbird
5

American Robin
20

Starling
166

Red-eyed Vireo
0

House Finch
90

Black-and-white Warbler
50

Tennessee Warbler
1

Northern Parula
1

Pine Warbler
3

American Redstart
233

Northern Waterthrush
151

Louisiana/Northern Waterthrush
25

Louisiana Waterthrush
7

Song Sparrow
0

Indigo Bunting
4

Bobolink
423

Baltimore Oriole
7

Yellow Warbler
124

Red-bellied Woodpecker
0

Field Sparrow
0

Downy Woodpecker
0

White-eyed Vireo
0

Black-throated Green Warbler
2

Common Grackle
20

Blue-winged Warbler
4

Least Flycatcher
1

Great Crested Flycatcher
1

Blackburnian Warbler
1

Prairie Warbler
4

Northern Flicker
1

Chestnut-sided Warbler
2

American Goldfinch
31

Worm-eating Warbler
2

Willow Flycatcher
0

Purple Martin
94
1
Blue Grosbeak
0

Prothonotary Warbler
5

Ruby-throated Hummingbird
6

Red-winged Blackbird
2119

Eastern Kingbird
763
9
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
120

warbler sp. 
105

Empidonax sp.
1

Brown-headed Cowbird
228